Argentine tango milonga, Vancouver
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HISTORY of TANGO ::

The music: a large amount of tango music has been composed by a variety of different orchestras over the last century. Not only is there a large volume of music, there is a breadth of stylistic differences between these orchestras as well, which makes it easier for Argentine tango dancers to spend the whole night dancing only Argentine tango. The four representative schools of the Argentine tango music are: Di Sarli, D’Arienzo, Troilo and Pugliese. They are dance orchestras, playing music for dancing. When the spirit of the music is characterized by counterpoint marking, clarity in the articulation is needed. It has a clear, repetitive pulse or beat, a strong tango-rhythm which is based on the 2x4, 2 strong beats on 4 (dos por cuatro). Astor Piazzolla stretched the classical harmony and counterpoint and moved the tango from the dance floor to the concert stage. His compositions tell us something of our contemporary life and dancing it relates much to modern dance.

History of Tango as a distinctive dance and the corresponding musical style of tango began in Buenos Aires Argentina, and Montevideo Uruguay, with roots traced into the cultures of several peoples that came together in these melting pots of ethnicities.

The word "tango" has no clear etymology. It may derive from a place-name used in African languages, or from the Latin verb tangere, meaning 'to touch'. However, it is more commonly thought that etymology of tango is from Niger-Congo origin, where tamgu means 'to dance'. The name was widely used among Black communities in Spanish America to refer to a place where people gathered to dance. Later the name was applied to various Black dance forms, leading up to the development of what is now known as tango.

The dance was originated in Buenos Aires and Montevideo, during the late 19th century. The music derived from the fusion of music from Europe, the South American Milonga, and African rhythms. The word Tango seems to have first been used in connection with the dance in the 1890s. Initially it was just one of the many dances, but it soon became popular throughout society, as theatres and street barrel organs spread it from the suburbs to the working-class slums, which were packed with hundreds of thousands of European immigrants.
The dance was soon found on the street, in bars, dance halls, and in the upper class venues such as the Teatro Opera, which started organizing balls that included tangos in 1902.

In the early years of the twentieth century, dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires and Montevideo travelled to Europe, and the first European tango craze took place in Paris, soon followed by London, Berlin, and other capitals. Towards the end of 1913 it hit New York in the USA, and Finland. These exported versions of Tango were modified to have less body contact ("Ballroom Tango"); however, the dance was still thought shocking by many, as had earlier been the case with dances such as the Waltz. In 1922 guidelines were first set for the "English" (international) style of ballroom tango, but it lost popularity in Europe to new dances including the Foxtrot and Samba, and as dancing as a whole declined due to the growth of cinema.

In Argentina, the onset in 1929 of the Great Depression, and restrictions introduced after the overthrow of the Hipólito Yrigoyen government in 1930 caused Tango to decline. Its fortunes were reversed as tango again became widely fashionable and a matter of national pride under the government of Juan Perón. Tango declined again in the 1950s with economic depression and as the military dictatorships banned public gatherings, followed by the popularity of Rock and Roll. The dance lived on in smaller venues until its revival in the 1980s following the opening in Paris of the show Tango Argentino and the Broadway musical Forever Tango.

 
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  Great LOCATION

St. Mary's Ukrainian Centre:
3150 Ash Street
-west of Cambie st. at 16th  and Ash st.
Ample free parking available
view MAP
 
  Great TANGO

Dance to the music of Di Sarli, D’Arienzo, Troilo and Pugliese, and watch the sun set in the ocean.
 
  Great ATMOSPHERE

A special place to enjoy Saturday-night tango and meet people from the Vancouver's argentine tango community.

TANGO TIPS:

Accommodation:
www.letsgoargentina.com
www.bytargentina.com
www.4rentargentina.com

Milonga places in Buenos Aires
Monday:
15:00 to 22:00 - Salon La Argentina/ El Arranque at Bartolome Mitre 1759 (our most favorite milonga, meeting the local milongueros/ milongueras in their 70's, especially being invited to dance with Osvaldo and Coca)
21:00 to 4:00 - Club Gricel at La Rioja 1180 (the best dance floor, but extremely crowded) read more...

Shopping tips
Comme il Faut - Arenales 1239 Puerta 3 Dpto. M (1061) - Tango shoes for women (You don't get to see their entire stock; their staff will pick for you based on what you describe, so be prepared)
Tango Leike - Sarmiento 1947 - Exquisite men shoes (shoes in the front, clothing at the back. Cash only for the clothing.) read more...

Classes tips
Escuela Argentina de Tango at Galleria Pacific, Centro Cultural Borges Recommendations:
1. Alejandro Figliolo and Valeria Inarra
2. Demian Garcia and Laura De Altube read more...

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